Rationale and design of the Exercise Intensity Trial (EXCITE): A randomized trial comparing the effects of moderate versus moderate to high-intensity aerobic training in women with operable breast cancer.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Exercise Intensity Trial (EXcITe) is a randomized trial to compare the efficacy of supervised moderate-intensity aerobic training to moderate to high-intensity aerobic training, relative to attention control, on aerobic capacity, physiologic mechanisms, patient-reported outcomes, and biomarkers in women with operable breast cancer following the completion of definitive adjuvant therapy. METHODS/DESIGN: Using a single-center, randomized design, 174 postmenopausal women (58 patients/study arm) with histologically confirmed, operable breast cancer presenting to Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) will be enrolled in this trial following completion of primary therapy (including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy). After baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomized to one of two supervised aerobic training interventions (moderate-intensity or moderate/high-intensity aerobic training) or an attention-control group (progressive stretching). The aerobic training interventions will include 150 mins.wk⁻¹ of supervised treadmill walking per week at an intensity of 60%-70% (moderate-intensity) or 60% to 100% (moderate to high-intensity) of the individually determined peak oxygen consumption (VO₂peak) between 20-45 minutes/session for 16 weeks. The progressive stretching program will be consistent with the exercise interventions in terms of program length (16 weeks), social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction), and duration (20-45 mins/session). The primary study endpoint is VO₂peak, as measured by an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test. Secondary endpoints include physiologic determinants that govern VO₂peak, patient-reported outcomes, and biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence/mortality. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and after the intervention (16 weeks). DISCUSSION: EXCITE is designed to investigate the intensity of aerobic training required to induce optimal improvements in VO₂peak and other pertinent outcomes in women who have completed definitive adjuvant therapy for operable breast cancer. Overall, this trial will inform and refine exercise guidelines to optimize recovery in breast and other cancer survivors following the completion of primary cytotoxic therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01186367.

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Description

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1186/1471-2407-10-531

Publication Info

Jones, Lee W, Pamela S Douglas, Neil D Eves, P Kelly Marcom, William E Kraus, James E Herndon, Brant A Inman, Jason D Allen, et al. (2010). Rationale and design of the Exercise Intensity Trial (EXCITE): A randomized trial comparing the effects of moderate versus moderate to high-intensity aerobic training in women with operable breast cancer. BMC Cancer, 10. p. 531. 10.1186/1471-2407-10-531 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4358.

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Scholars@Duke

Marcom

Paul Kelly Marcom

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Medicine

Basic Science:
-Germline and somatic genetic changes in breast cancer.

Translational:
-Identification and management of individuals and families with hereditary cancer risk.
-Communication of cancer risk information to individuals and families.
-Breast cancer prevention.
-Optimizing management of early breast cancer.
-Treatment of metastatic breast cancer


Clinically, Dr. Marcom works as a medical oncologist in the multidisciplinary breast cancer clinic. He participates in clinical trials investigating new chemotherapeutic and biologic treatments. 

Kraus

William Erle Kraus

Richard and Pat Johnson University Distinguished Professor

My training, expertise and research interests range from human integrative physiology and genetics to animal exercise models to cell culture models of skeletal muscle adaptation to mechanical stretch. I am trained clinically as an internist and preventive cardiologist, with particular expertise in preventive cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation.  My research training spans molecular biology and cell culture, molecular genetics, and integrative human exercise physiology and metabolism. I practice as a preventive cardiologist with a focus on cardiometabolic risk and exercise physiology for older athletes.  My research space has both a basic wet laboratory component and a human integrative physiology one.

One focus of our work is an integrative physiologic examination of exercise effects in human subjects in clinical studies of exercise training in normal individuals, in individuals at risk of disease (such as pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome; STRRIDE), and in individuals with disease (such as coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure and cancer).

A second focus of my research group is exploration of genetic determinates of disease risk in human subjects.  We conduct studies of early onset cardiovascular disease (GENECARD; CATHGEN), congestive heart failure (HF-ACTION), peripheral arterial disease (AMNESTI), and metabolic syndrome.  We are exploring analytic models of predicting disease risk using established and innovative statistical methodology.

A third focus of my group’s work is to understand the cellular signaling mechanisms underlying the normal adaptive responses of skeletal muscle to physiologic stimuli, such as occur in exercise conditioning, and to understand the abnormal maladaptive responses that occur in response to pathophysiologic stimuli, such as occur in congestive heart failure, aging and prolonged exposure to microgravity.

Recently we have begun to investigate interactions of genes and lifestyle interventions on cardiometabolic outcomes.  We have experience with clinical lifestyle intervention studies, particularly the contributions of genetic variants to interventions responses.  We call this Lifestyle Medicopharmacogenetics.

KEY WORDS:

exercise, skeletal muscle, energy metabolism, cell signaling, gene expression, cell stretch, heart failure, aging, spaceflight, human genetics, early onset cardiovascular disease, lifestyle medicine

Herndon

James Emmett Herndon

Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Current research interests have application to the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials. Specifically, interests include the use of time-dependent covariables within survival models, the design of phase II cancer clinical trials which minimize some of the logistical problems associated with their conduct, and the analysis of longitudinal studies with informative censoring (in particular, quality of life studies of patients with advanced cancer).

Inman

Brant Allen Inman

Professor of Surgery

Clinical research interests:
Clinical trials of novel diagnostic tests and therapies for genitourinary malignancies, with a strong focus on bladder cancer.

Basic science research interests:
Immune therapies for cancer, hyperthermia and heat-based treatment of cancer, molecular biology of genitourinary cancers, novel diagnostics and therapies for genitourinary cancers


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