Resilience as a predictor of treatment response in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder treated with venlafaxine extended release or placebo.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2012-06

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

16
views
23
downloads

Citation Stats

Attention Stats

Abstract

This post-hoc analysis evaluated resilience as a predictor of treatment response in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were pooled from two randomized, double-blind studies conducted with adult outpatients treated with flexible doses of venlafaxine extended release (ER) 37.5 to 300 mg/day or placebo. The 17-item Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (CAPS-SX(17)) was the primary outcome measure. Baseline Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores for the 25-, 10-, and 2-item versions were used to predict changes in PTSD symptom severity at week 12 and symptomatic remission (CAPS-SX(17) ≤ 20). Analyses were conducted for the overall population and separately for the individual treatment groups. In total, pretreatment resilience predicted a positive treatment response. For the overall population, all versions of the CD-RISC predicted CAPS-SX(17) change scores and remission after controlling for variables such as treatment group and baseline symptom severity. For venlafaxine ER-treated patients, all versions of the CD-RISC were predictive of remission, but only the 10-item version was predictive of CAPS-SX(17) change score. Our results suggest that higher pretreatment resilience is generally associated with a positive treatment response. Future research may be warranted to explore the relationship between response to active treatment and the spectrum of resiliency.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1177/0269881111413821

Publication Info

Davidson, Jonathan, Dan J Stein, Barbara O Rothbaum, Ron Pedersen, Annette Szumski and David S Baldwin (2012). Resilience as a predictor of treatment response in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder treated with venlafaxine extended release or placebo. Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 26(6). pp. 778–783. 10.1177/0269881111413821 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25998.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Jonathan R.T. Davidson

Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Currently, my research focuses upon the theoretical aspects of homeopathy and its clinical utilization, as well as the broader field of alternative (complementary) medicine. this is a field which has traditionally been overlooked as a legitimate scientific discipline. Other areas of activity are as in the past, i.e., clinical treatment, epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis of posttraumatic stress, social phobia, other anxiety status, and depression. These are illustrated by recent publications on treatment, epidemiology, health service utilization and quality of life in social phobia and PTSD, drug treatment of panic disorder. Magnetic resonance studies of social phobia have been completed and further studies are planned.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.