Beyond Mechanical Tension: A Review of Resistance Exercise-Induced Lactate Responses & Muscle Hypertrophy

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<jats:p>The present review aims to explore and discuss recent research relating to the lactate response to resistance training and the potential mechanisms by which lactate may contribute to skeletal muscle hypertrophy or help to prevent muscle atrophy. First, we will discuss foundational information pertaining to lactate including metabolism, measurement, shuttling, and potential (although seemingly elusive) mechanisms for hypertrophy. We will then provide a brief analysis of resistance training protocols and the associated lactate response. Lastly, we will discuss potential shortcomings, resistance training considerations, and future research directions regarding lactate’s role as a potential anabolic agent for skeletal muscle hypertrophy.</jats:p>

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10.3390/jfmk7040081

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Lawson, Daniel, Christopher Vann, Brad J Schoenfeld and Cody Haun (n.d.). Beyond Mechanical Tension: A Review of Resistance Exercise-Induced Lactate Responses & Muscle Hypertrophy. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology, 7(4). pp. 81–81. 10.3390/jfmk7040081 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29755.

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