Coloring the Sacred: Visions of Devotional Kinship in Colonial Peru and Brazil

dc.contributor.advisor

Sigal, Pete H

dc.contributor.author

Garriott, Caroline A

dc.date.accessioned

2019-06-07T19:48:54Z

dc.date.available

2021-05-21T08:17:14Z

dc.date.issued

2019

dc.department

History

dc.description.abstract

My dissertation, “Coloring the Sacred: Visions of Devotional Kinship in Colonial Peru and Brazil,” spans disciplinary, linguistic, and imperial bounds to explore how local devotion to saints expressed through visual media informed broader debates on the enslavement and the spiritual conquest of “New” world populations in colonial Brazil and Peru. Specifically, I explore a range of social actors—African slaves, indigenous muleteers, Portuguese merchants, and Spanish clergymen—who contributed to the multi-directional process of “coloring the sacred” by producing, consuming, and circulating images of saints. Juxtaposing an iconographic analysis of sacred image-objects (paintings, prints, sculptures, crucifixes, and oratories) alongside textual sources, I historicize how lay devotion to saints and their images could simultaneously bridge and mark ethnic divides, thus contributing to rich theoretical debates on hybridity, religion, and the construction of race in the Iberian Atlantic world.

dc.identifier.uri

https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18745

dc.subject

History

dc.subject

Latin American studies

dc.subject

Art history

dc.subject

Colonial Latin America

dc.subject

Hybridity

dc.subject

Race

dc.subject

Religion

dc.subject

Visual Studies

dc.title

Coloring the Sacred: Visions of Devotional Kinship in Colonial Peru and Brazil

dc.type

Dissertation

duke.embargo.months

23

Files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Garriott_duke_0066D_15081.pdf
Size:
23.84 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format

Collections