A Site Prioritization for Shortleaf Pine Restoration in Duke Forest

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Date

2022-12-10

Authors

Sneed, Anne

Advisors

Urban, Dean

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Abstract

Historically, shortleaf pine forests spanned some 70-80 million acres in the U.S. Since then, the species has declined dramatically—today, only 6 million acres of shortleaf-dominated forests remain, roughly 10 percent of its historic range. North Carolina alone has seen a 60 percent decline in shortleaf pine acreage since 1990. There are several reasons for the decline, including fire suppression, land use changes from forest to urban-suburban development, and disease and pests.

Due to these losses, the Duke Forest is seeking to restore shortleaf pine on its land. For this project, key site characteristics of Duke Forest parcels are collected, analyzed, and compared to historical data using geospatial analysis and habitat suitability modeling. The analysis is then used to identify candidate restoration sites for shortleaf pine within Duke Forest’s Durham and Korstian divisions. This site prioritization sets the stage for a successful restoration project of shortleaf pine in Duke Forest.

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Sneed, Anne (2022). A Site Prioritization for Shortleaf Pine Restoration in Duke Forest. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26353.


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