Migraine headaches following mitral valvuloplasty: Koch's postulates finally satisfied?

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2013-06

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Abstract

The relationship between patent foramen ovale and migraine headache is a topic surrounded by much controversy. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman who underwent successful percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty for rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, but had an immediate postprocedural course complicated by refractory migraine headaches. Interestingly, resolution of her headaches coincided with the spontaneous closure of the interatrial communication created during valvuloplasty. This suggests interatrial flow as an important trigger for migraine headaches in this patient.

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Krasuski

Richard Andrew Krasuski

Professor of Medicine

Dr. Richard Krasuski is Director of the Adult Congenital Heart Center at Duke University Medical Center, the Director of Hemodynamic Research, and the Medical Director of the CTEPH Program. He is considered a thought leader in the fields of pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease. His research focus is in epidemiologic and clinical studies involving patients with pulmonary hypertension and patients with congenital heart disease. He is involved in multiple multicenter studies through the Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC). He has also helped to develop multiple research databases in these patient populations. He is Co-PI in the upcoming EPIPHANY Study examining the impact of medical and transcatheter interventions on RV-PA coupling in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Over his career he has mentored over 80 students, residents and fellows and has published over 300 peer reviewed publications, book chapters and meeting abstracts. He is also the Chief Editor of Advances in Pulmonary Hypertension and on the editorial boards of several leading medical journals.


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