Sustained Virologic Response in People Who Inject Drugs and/or Who Are on Opioid Agonist Therapy: Is 90% Enough?

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2019-04

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10.1002/hep4.1347

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Naggie, Susanna, and Christian B Ramers (2019). Sustained Virologic Response in People Who Inject Drugs and/or Who Are on Opioid Agonist Therapy: Is 90% Enough?. Hepatology communications, 3(4). pp. 453–455. 10.1002/hep4.1347 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26707.

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Naggie

Susanna Naggie

Professor of Medicine

Dr. Susanna Naggie completed her undergraduate degrees in chemical engineering and biochemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park, and her medical education at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She conducted her internal medicine and infectious diseases fellowship training at Duke University Medical Center, where she also served as Chief Resident. She joined the faculty in the Duke School of Medicine in 2009. She is a Professor of Medicine and currently holds appointments at the Duke University School of Medicine, at the Duke Clinical Research Institute, and at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Naggie is a clinical investigator with a focus in clinical trials in infectious diseases and translational research in HIV and liver disease. She is a standing member of the DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents and the CDC/NIH/IDSA-HIVMA Opportunistic Infections Guideline. She is the Vice Dean for Clinical and Translational Research and Director for the Duke Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.


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