Cost Effectiveness of Universal Hepatitis B Virus Screening in Patients Beginning Chemotherapy for Sarcomas or GI Stromal Tumors.

Abstract

Purpose

The value of screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection before chemotherapy for nonhematopoietic solid tumors remains unsettled. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of universal screening before systemic therapy for sarcomas, including GI stromal tumors (GISTs).

Patients and methods

Drawing from the National Cancer Centre Singapore database of 1,039 patients with sarcomas, we analyzed the clinical records of 485 patients who received systemic therapy. Using a Markov model, we compared the cost effectiveness of a screen-all versus screen-none strategy in this population.

Results

A total of 237 patients were screened for HBV infection. No patients developed HBV reactivation during chemotherapy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of offering HBV screening to all patients with sarcomas and patients with GISTs exceeded the cost-effectiveness threshold of SG$100,000 per QALY. This result was robust in one-way sensitivity analysis. Our results show that only changes in mortality rate secondary to HBV reactivation could make the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio cross the cost-effectiveness threshold.

Conclusion

Universal HBV screening in patients with sarcomas or GISTs undergoing chemotherapy is not cost effective at a willingness to pay of SG$100,000 per QALY and may not be required.

Department

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Provenance

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1200/jgo.2015.001669

Publication Info

Tan, Glorijoy, Ke Zhou, Chee Hian Tan, David B Matchar, Mohamad Farid, Richard Quek and Joanne Ngeow (2016). Cost Effectiveness of Universal Hepatitis B Virus Screening in Patients Beginning Chemotherapy for Sarcomas or GI Stromal Tumors. Journal of global oncology, 2(4). pp. 186–199. 10.1200/jgo.2015.001669 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/22817.

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