Social networks, health-promoting behaviors, and health-related quality of life in older adults with and without arthritis.

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2019-01

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Abstract

The purpose of this secondary analysis study was to compare social networks, health-promoting behaviors, and health-related quality of life of South Korean adults, aged 65 years or older, with and without arthritis, and to identify factors that are related to health-related quality of life. The sample consisted of 103 adults with arthritis and 123 adults without arthritis. Data were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance, χ2-test, Pearson's correlation, and multiple regression analysis. All variables except age and religion showed statistically significant differences between older adults with and without arthritis. The group with arthritis reported lower scores on social networks, health-promoting behaviors, and health-related quality of life compared to the healthy group without arthritis. Analyzed using multiple regression, 43.8% of the older adults with arthritis had the factors related to health-related quality of life (F = 40.71, p < .001) including exercise (β = .43, p < .001) and living with someone (β = .32, p = .001). In the group of older adults without arthritis, 26.2% had the factors related to health-related quality of life (F = 15.44, p < .001) including exercise (β = .31, p = .001), social gatherings, and employment status. Exercise was one of the factors that showed the strongest relationship to health-related quality of life. The provision of resources that can enable an individual to engage in physical activities is warranted.

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10.1371/journal.pone.0220180

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Hong, Minjoo, Hyewon Shin and Jennie C De Gagne (2019). Social networks, health-promoting behaviors, and health-related quality of life in older adults with and without arthritis. PloS one, 14(7). p. e0220180. 10.1371/journal.pone.0220180 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26995.

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De Gagne

Jennie De Gagne

Clinical Professor in the School of Nursing

Jennie Chang De Gagne, PhD, DNP, RN, NPD-BC, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, is a Clinical Professor and the Director of the Nursing Education Major/Certificate at the Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON). She is dedicated to advancing the science of teaching and learning through the application of instructional technologies, creating a student-centered environment that fosters meaningful and constructive learning experiences. Her expertise in cybercivility positions her at the forefront of this crucial field, leading her to develop and spearhead innovative projects that address incivility in cyberspace among health professionals and students. With over 200 publications, including 120 in peer-reviewed journals, and 150 presentations on topics such as technology integration in the classroom, faculty development in online education, and cybercivility, she has demonstrated exceptional productivity in disseminating her scholarly work. Additionally, she has expertise in providing distance/online instruction for workforce training.

De Gagne is board certified in Nursing Professional Development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center and has earned certification as a nurse educator from the National League for Nursing. She is a member of the National League for Nursing Academy of Nursing Education and the American Academy of Nursing. Throughout her professional and academic career, she has received scholarships and awards. Her expertise has garnered national and international media attention, leading to interviews in both print and digital media.


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