Return to the Motherland: Maternal Landscape and Evolution of Homo Sacer in Beckett, Coetzee, Fugard and Duiker

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2013

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Henderson, Olivia

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Moses, Michael V

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Abstract

This paper examines how Beckett and Coetzee probe the limits of the human (physically, psychologically, spiritually, legally, politically) and compares and contrasts these two writers (who operate in a more-or-less allegorical land- and timescape) with Athol Fugard and his Boesman and Lena (which operates in a more particularized, apartheid-specific setting). The latter portion considers how K Sello Duiker's Thirteen Cents explores internal displacement and being on the fringes of personhood/humanity and reproduces a similar kind of circular mini-odyssey not unlike Coetzee's Michael K. Also of interest is Nixon's "environmentalism of the poor," in relation to the lightness of being that K aspires to--what is the very least one actually needs to sustain human life?

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Henderson, Olivia (2013). Return to the Motherland: Maternal Landscape and Evolution of Homo Sacer in Beckett, Coetzee, Fugard and Duiker. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/7331.

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