Mechanisms Underlying Bone Cell Recovery During Zebrafish Fin Regeneration

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Date

2013

Authors

Singh, Sumeet Pal

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Poss, Kenneth D

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Abstract

Zebrafish regenerate amputated caudal fins, restoring the size and shape of the original appendage. Regeneration requires generation of diverse cell types comprising the adult fin tissue. Knowledge of the cellular source of new cells and the molecules involved is fundamental to our understanding of regenerative responses. In this dissertation, the contribution made by the bone cells towards fin regeneration is investigated. Fate mapping of osteoblasts revealed that spared osteoblasts contribute only to regenerating osteoblasts and not to other cell types, thereby suggesting lineage restriction during fin regeneration. The functional significance of osteoblast contribution to fin regeneration is tested by developing an osteoblast ablation tool capable of drug induced loss of bone cells. Normal fin regeneration in the absence of resident osteoblast population suggests that the osteoblast contribution is dispensable and provides evidence for cellular plasticity during fin regeneration. To uncover the genes involved in proliferation of osteoblasts within the fin regenerate, a candidate in-situ screen was carried out and revealed bone specific expression of fgfr4 and twist3. Transgenic tools for visualization of gene expression confirmed the screen results. Knockdown of twist3 by morpholino antisense technology impedes fin regeneration. Mutant heterozygotes for twist3 were generated using genome editing reagents, which will enable loss-of-function study in future.

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Singh, Sumeet Pal (2013). Mechanisms Underlying Bone Cell Recovery During Zebrafish Fin Regeneration. Dissertation, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/8218.

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