Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: Multimodal Therapy.

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2023-01

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Abstract

Despite a steady decline in incidence and mortality rates, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second most common cancer diagnosis in women and the third most common in men worldwide. Notably, the liver is recognized as the most common site of CRC metastasis, and metastases to the liver remain the primary driver of disease-specific mortality for patients with CRC. Although hepatic resection is the backbone of curative-intent treatment, management of CRLM has become increasingly multimodal during the last decade and includes the use of downstaging chemotherapy, ablation techniques, and locoregional therapy, each of which are reviewed herein.

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10.1016/j.soc.2022.07.009

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Aykut, Berk, and Michael E Lidsky (2023). Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: Multimodal Therapy. Surgical oncology clinics of North America, 32(1). pp. 119–141. 10.1016/j.soc.2022.07.009 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/30170.

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Scholars@Duke

Aykut

Berk Aykut

House Staff

College/University: Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg

Medical School: Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg

Lidsky

Michael Evan Lidsky

Associate Professor of Surgery

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