Incarcerated women's HPV awareness, beliefs, and experiences

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2015-03-16

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

7
views
9
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

<jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-heading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p> – The purpose of this paper is to explore incarcerated women's awareness, beliefs, and experiences with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-heading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p> – Researchers conducted focus groups with 45 incarcerated women in an urban Midwestern US jail to assess how women talked about their Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening and abnormal Pap test follow-up experiences. Some focus group questions specifically assessed individual awareness, beliefs, and experiences with HPV infection and vaccination. Based on these data, the authors described participants’ awareness of HPV, as well as used open coding to ultimately extract themes related to beliefs and experiences with HPV infection and vaccine. </jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-heading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p> – While all 45 participants reported experiencing an abnormal Pap test event within the last five years, only two-thirds of participants (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>=30) reported having heard of the HPV infection. Several themes emerged from the analysis of the data: the women's beliefs about cause and severity of HPV; frustration with age requirements of the vaccine; varied experiences with vaccinations for themselves and their children; the impact of media exposure on knowledge; and desire for more HPV infection and vaccine information. </jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-heading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p> – Incarcerated women's awareness and limited experiences with HPV infection and vaccination may be a barrier to adequate screening and cervical cancer prevention. This study has implications for the development of cervical health education for this high-risk group of women, who are four to five times as likely to have cervical cancer as non-incarcerated women.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Department

Description

Provenance

Subjects

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1108/ijph-05-2014-0012

Publication Info

Pankey, Tyson, and Megha Ramaswamy (2015). Incarcerated women's HPV awareness, beliefs, and experiences. International Journal of Prisoner Health, 11(1). pp. 49–58. 10.1108/ijph-05-2014-0012 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26981.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Pankey

Tyson L Pankey

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.