SCREENING FOR A CHRONIC DISEASE: A MULTIPLE STAGE DURATION MODEL WITH PARTIAL OBSERVABILITY

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2016-08-01

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© (2016) by the Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research AssociationWe estimate a dynamic multistage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, whereas the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

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10.1111/iere.12180

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Mroz, TA, G Picone, F Sloan and AP Yashkin (2016). SCREENING FOR A CHRONIC DISEASE: A MULTIPLE STAGE DURATION MODEL WITH PARTIAL OBSERVABILITY. International Economic Review, 57(3). pp. 915–934. 10.1111/iere.12180 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14801.

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