Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a woman with neuromyelitis optica.

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2014-05-01

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Abstract

Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or Devic's disease, is an idiopathic severe demyelinating disease that preferentially affects the optic nerve and spinal cord. Neuraxial anesthesia in women with multiple sclerosis is widely accepted, but reports of the use of neuraxial anesthesia in patients with NMO are scarce. We report the case of a morbidly obese primigravida undergoing a planned cesarean delivery at 32 weeks' gestation due to an acute exacerbation of NMO, managed with spinal anesthesia. Other than increased intraoperative hyperalgesia requiring inhaled nitrous oxide/oxygen, the mother experienced no apparent anesthetic-related complications.

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10.1213/XAA.0000000000000016

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Greene, NH, E Dinges, C Ciliberto, M Sedensky and R Landau (2014). Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a woman with neuromyelitis optica. A A Case Rep, 2(9). pp. 108–110. 10.1213/XAA.0000000000000016 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/9373.

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