Nonpharmacologic, nonherbal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: an umbrella systematic review (protocol).

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women. Our review seeks to address the following question: In women with menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms, what are the effects on health-related quality of life, vasomotor symptoms, and adverse events of the following nonpharmacologic, nonherbal interventions as compared with any inactive control or active comparator: (a) acupuncture, (b) yoga, tai chi, and qigong, (c) structured exercise, and (d) meditation, mindfulness-based practices, and relaxation? METHODS: We describe a protocol for an umbrella review approach, supplemented by evaluating randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published after the most recent good-quality systematic review for each of the eligible interventions. Specific interventions were chosen based on current literature and with input from a technical expert panel and organizational stakeholders. We will conduct a thorough literature search and perform a quality assessment of potentially included systematic reviews and RCTs. DISCUSSION: Our umbrella review, supplemented by an additional search for eligible RCTs, aims to synthesize existing evidence on the use of nonpharmacologic, nonherbal interventions to manage bothersome vasomotor symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42016029335.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1186/s13643-016-0232-6

Publication Info

Goldstein, Karen M, Jennifer R McDuffie, Megan Shepherd-Banigan, Deanna Befus, Remy R Coeytaux, Megan G Van Noord, Adam P Goode, Varsha Masilamani, et al. (2016). Nonpharmacologic, nonherbal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: an umbrella systematic review (protocol). Syst Rev, 5. p. 56. 10.1186/s13643-016-0232-6 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13072.

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Scholars@Duke

Goldstein

Karen M. Goldstein

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. Goldstein's research interests include women's health, cardiovascular risk reduction, evidence synthesis methodology and peer support.

Shepherd-Banigan

Megan E Shepherd-Banigan

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Dr. Megan Shepherd-Banigan designs research studies to improve the health, emotional well-being, and social functioning of adults with mental and physical disabilities. Her methods combine empirical approaches that address methodologically challenging research questions in health systems and policy research. Dr. Shepherd-Banigan uses large survey and administrative datasets to evaluate the impact of policies that support family members to care for adults with disabilities.  

Dr. Shepherd-Banigan won a VA Career Development Award from 2019-2024 and is studying ways to strengthen family support for veterans under-going traumatic stress treatment. She also leads a project that surveys family caregivers of Vietnam-era veterans who might be eligible for expanded support services under the VA Mission Act to evaluate program impacts. As co-investigator on an NIA-funded CARE IDEAS study (Terri Wetle, PI) , she is investigating end-of-life-care planning and well-being among dementia care dyads.  Finally, Dr. Shepherd-Banigan is leading a project in partnership with the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregivers to identify creative empirically-based approaches to support family caregivers. 



Coeytaux

Remy Rene Coeytaux

Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
Goode

Adam Payne Goode

Professor in Orthopaedic Surgery

Dr. Goode is an Associate Professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. He is a physical therapist by clinical training and epidemiologist by scientific training. His focus is on understanding the etiology of low back pain and other chronic musculoskeletal conditions and improving the delivery of care for patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.  In his research he has published in the areas of the relationship between individual radiographic features in the lumbar spine and clinical symptoms, biomarkers and peripheral joint osteoarthritis. 

Adam

Soheir Saeed Adam

Associate Professor of Medicine
Williams

John Wiley Williams

Professor of Medicine

John Williams, MD, MHS, is a Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a past recipient of VA Health Services Career Development and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Faculty Scholar Awards. He received his bachelor and MD degrees from the University of North Carolina. Dr. Williams completed residency training at the University of Iowa and a research fellowship at Duke University. He is a primary care internist who is trained in epidemiology, biostatistics, and literature synthesis. Dr. Williams’ topical interests include depression, mental health services, dementia and implementation of best practices. He is a medical editor for the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the Evidence-base Practice Program. Dr. Williams is Senior Science Advisor to the Durham VA Evidence Synthesis Program and has led numerous systematic reviews, many focusing on mental health services. Dr. Williams is board certified in Internal Medicine and active in clinical practice and resident physician education at the Durham VAMC.


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