The Impact of COVID-19 on Hypertension and Hypertension Medication Adherence Among Underrepresented Racial and Ethnic Groups: A Scoping Review.

Abstract

Purpose of review

To conduct a scoping review of articles which examined the impact of COVID-19 on HTN and HTN medication adherence among underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities.

Recent findings

Seven studies were included in this review and impact of COVID-19 was examined at 4 levels: patient, provider, health system and society. The results indicated that patient level factors, such as high unemployment and inequitable access to telemedicine due to society factors- lack of access to high-speed Internet and variation in the offering of telehealth by health systems, were most impactful on adherence. Additionally, provider level clinical inertia may have further impacted adherence to HTN medication. Our review showed that the COVID-19 pandemic did not introduce new barriers but exacerbated preexisting barriers. Ongoing efforts are needed to change policies at the state and local levels to dismantle inequities in underrepresented communities to ensure access to health care with telemedicine to promote health equity.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1007/s11906-023-01262-4

Publication Info

Foster, Marva, Anna Etchin, Charlene Pope, Christine W Hartmann, Oluwabunmi Emidio and Hayden B Bosworth (2023). The Impact of COVID-19 on Hypertension and Hypertension Medication Adherence Among Underrepresented Racial and Ethnic Groups: A Scoping Review. Current hypertension reports, 25(11). pp. 385–394. 10.1007/s11906-023-01262-4 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29339.

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