An Undiagnosed Paraganglioma in a 58-Year-Old Female Who Underwent Tumor Resection.

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2017

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Abstract

Paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors that can have high morbidity and mortality if undiagnosed. Here we report a case of an undiagnosed paraganglioma in a 58-year-old female who underwent tumor resection. The patient became severely hypertensive intraoperatively with paroxysmal swings in blood pressure and then later became acutely hypotensive after tumor removal. She was managed in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) postoperatively and discharged from the hospital without acute complications. We briefly discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, perioperative management, and possible complications of these tumors to assist healthcare providers if one were to encounter them.

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10.1155/2017/5796409

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Fox, William C, Matthew Read, Richard E Moon, Eugene W Moretti and Brian J Colin (2017). An Undiagnosed Paraganglioma in a 58-Year-Old Female Who Underwent Tumor Resection. Case Rep Anesthesiol, 2017. p. 5796409. 10.1155/2017/5796409 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16054.

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Moon

Richard Edward Moon

Professor of Anesthesiology

Research interests include the study of cardiorespiratory function in humans during challenging clinical settings including the perioperative period, and exposure to environmental conditions such as diving and high altitude. Studies have included gas exchange during diving, the pathophysiology of high altitude and immersion pulmonary edema, the effect of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia on pulmonary function and monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Ongoing human studies include the effect of respiratory muscle training on chemosensitivity and blood gases during stressful breathing: underwater exercise.


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