Recommendations For Implementing a Carbon Tax in Boulder, Colorado

dc.contributor.advisor

Bennear, Lori

dc.contributor.author

Arostegui, Danielle

dc.contributor.author

Brinks, Rachel

dc.contributor.author

Callihan, Ryan

dc.contributor.author

Louis-Prescott, Leah

dc.contributor.author

Mechak, Lauren

dc.date.accessioned

2018-04-27T18:15:50Z

dc.date.available

2018-04-27T18:15:50Z

dc.date.issued

2018-04

dc.department

Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

dc.description.abstract

Boulder, Colorado, a small city located approximately 30 minutes outside of Denver, has historically funded its Climate Action Plan through a tax on electricity (“CAP tax.”) In addition to generating revenue, the CAP tax serves as a carbon pricing mechanism. With the CAP tax expiring in 2023, this report examines what updates the city could make to the tax so it: 1) continues to generate revenue, 2) incorporates other fuels such as natural gas, and 3) better reflects the societal cost of greenhouse gas emissions. We provide recommendations and next steps to the city based on our analysis of the city’s regulatory authority, research on worldwide carbon pricing systems, and quantitative model results. We find that a charge reflecting the full social cost of carbon (~$42 in 2020) could greatly increase revenue beyond historical CAP tax levels, and that incorporating the natural gas sector at a lower rate could provide long-term funding stability for the city.

dc.identifier.uri

https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16588

dc.language.iso

en_US

dc.subject

carbon tax

dc.subject

carbon pricing

dc.subject

greenhouse gas emissions

dc.subject

city policy

dc.subject

electricity tax

dc.title

Recommendations For Implementing a Carbon Tax in Boulder, Colorado

dc.type

Master's project

duke.embargo.months

0

Files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
MP Report Draft_Revised.pdf
Size:
1.47 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description: