Parity assignments in 172,174Yb using polarized photons and the K quantum number in rare earth nuclei

Abstract

The 100% polarized photon beam at the high intensity γ ray source (HIγS) at Duke University has been used to determine the parity of six dipole excitations between 2.9 and 3.6 MeV in the deformed nuclei 172,174Yb in photon scattering (γ →, γ′) experiments. The measured parities are compared with previous assignments based on the K quantum number that had been assigned in nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments by using the Alaga rules. A systematic survey of the relation between γ-decay branching ratios and parity quantum numbers is given for the rare earth nuclei. © 2005 The American Physical Society.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1103/PhysRevC.71.034304

Publication Info

Savran, D, S Muller, A Zilges, M Babilon, MW Ahmed, JH Kelley, A Tonchev, kW Tornow, et al. (2005). Parity assignments in 172,174Yb using polarized photons and the K quantum number in rare earth nuclei. Physical Review C - Nuclear Physics, 71(3). 10.1103/PhysRevC.71.034304 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11080.

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Scholars@Duke

Weller

Henry R. Weller

Professor Emeritus of Physics

Dr. Weller's research program at TUNL has been concentrated on using radiative capture reactions induced by polarized beams of protons and deuterons to study nuclear systems. These measurements have permitted him to observe the "D-state" in the 4He nucleus, which arises from the two body tensor force. This result changes the rate of the d+d fusion reaction by almost a factor of 50 at very low energies. This is of great interest in nuclear astrophysics. In the past year, he has focused on studies of (d,n) reactions using very low energy polarized beams. Such studies have not been previously performed. These reactions are of great interest in nuclear astrophysics. Dr. Weller is also working to help develop an intense beam of polarized gamma-rays using the facilities of the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory. (Dr. Weller is the Nuclear Physics Program Manager and is in charge of the development of the target room for the HIGS Project at DFELL). This beam will ultimately allow new experimental studies capable of testing fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics in the low-energy sector, such as the up-to-down quark mass ratio. The experiments at HIGS require very sophisticated targets and detector systems. Dr. Weller is leading the development of these. The first experiments using these setups and the upgraded HIGS facility are expected to begin in the spring of 2008.

Wu

Ying Wu

Professor of Physics

Prof. Wu is interested in nonlinear dynamics of charged particle beams, coherent radiation sources, and the development of novel accelerators and light sources. One of his research focuses is to study the charged particle nonlinear dynamics using the modern techniques such as Lie Algebra, Differential Algebra, and Frequency Analysis. This direction of research will significantly further the understanding of the nonlinear phenomena in light source storage rings and collider rings, improve their performance, and provide guidance for developing next generation storage rings. The second area of research is to study and develop coherent radiation sources such as broad-band far infrared radiation from dipole magnets and coherent mm-wave radiation from a free-electron-laser (FEL). With this direction of research, he hopes to study the beam stability issues, in particular, the single bunch instabilities in the storage ring, develop diagnostics to monitor and improve the stability of the light source beams, and eventually develop novel means to overcome instabilities. These areas of research will provide foundations for developing a femto-second hard x-ray Compton back scattering radiation source driven by a mm-wave FEL - a next generation light source.


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