Serum potassium is a predictor of incident diabetes in African Americans with normal aldosterone: the Jackson Heart Study

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.3945/ajcn.116.143255

Publication Info

Chatterjee, Ranee, Clemontina A Davenport, Laura P Svetkey, Bryan C Batch, Pao-Hwa Lin, Vasan S Ramachandran, Ervin R Fox, Jane Harman, et al. (2017). Serum potassium is a predictor of incident diabetes in African Americans with normal aldosterone: the Jackson Heart Study. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 105(2). pp. 442–449. 10.3945/ajcn.116.143255 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15643.

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Scholars@Duke

Chatterjee

Ranee Chatterjee

Associate Professor of Medicine
Davenport

Tina Davenport

Biostatistician, Senior

Clemontina A. Davenport earned a MSTAT and PhD in Statistics at NC State University. Dr. Davenport has extensive collaborative research experience investigating factors that may explain racial disparities in health outcomes, primarily in kidney disease, but also in diabetes, hypertension cardiovascular disease, and other areas. She teaches a first-year masters level class and is passionate about teaching, mentorship, and the importance of diversity and equity in research and healthcare.

Svetkey

Laura Pat Svetkey

Professor of Medicine

Laura P. Svetkey, MD MHS is Professor of Medicine/Nephrology, Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Diversity in the Department of Medicine. She is also the Director of Duke’s CTSA-sponsored internal career development award program (KL2) and the Associate Director of Duke’s REACH Equity Disparities Research Center, in which she also leads the Investigator Development Core.

Dr. Svetkey has over 30 years of experience in the investigation of hypertension, obesity, and related areas, conducting NIH-sponsored clinical research ranging from behavioral intervention trials to metabolomics and genetics, with a consistent focus on prevention, non-pharmacologic intervention, health disparities and minority health. Her research has affected national guidelines, having served on the 2013 national Hypertension Guideline Panel (JNC) and the Lifestyle Guideline Working Group. She is an American Society of Hypertension certified hypertension specialist, and a member of the Association of American Physicians (AAP). She is the Associate Director, Core Director and Project PI of Duke’s NIH-sponsored REACH Equity Disparities Research Center (PI: Kimberly Johnson).

As Department of Medicine Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Diversity, she implements a wide range of programs to enhance the experience and advancement of faculty and trainees, with particular emphasis on those from racial and ethnic groups under-represented in medicine, and women.

Batch

Bryan Courtney Batch

Professor of Medicine

Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity/Overweight, Behavior change, Non-pharmacologic intervention, Health disparities

Lin

Pao-Hwa Lin

Professor in Medicine

My research interest lies generally in the area of dietary patterns and chronic diseases including hypertension using controlled feeding study and lifestyle intervention designs.

Two major controlled feeding clinical trials that I was involved in include the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Study and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-Sodium (DASH-Sodium) Study. In addition to being an active member for the diet committee for DASH, I also function as the chair of the diet committee for the DASH-Sodium study.  I am familiar with the development and operation of a controlled feeding study, which means the process of study design, development of questionnaire/forms for data collection/monitoring, development of quality assurance procedure, and data analysis.

I've also helped with the design and implementation of the lifestyle behavioral intervention program for the Hypertension Improvement Project (HIP), PREMIER clinical trial, Weight Loss Maintenance trial (WLM), ENCORE study, and the Cell Phone Intervention for You (CITY) trial.

Key words: Diet, controlled feeding study, mineral, blood pressure, nutrition.

Edelman

David Edward Edelman

Professor of Medicine

My general interests are in the improve quality of care for chronic illness, using diabetes as a model. While I have performed research on screening for, diagnosis of, and clinical severity of unrecognized diabetes in patient care settings, my current line of work is in using health systems interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease, and to improve outcomes from comorbid diabetes and hypertension.


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