Faculty Profile Systems: New Services and Roles for Libraries

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Date

2017-04

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Abstract

Many universities have implemented faculty pro le systems that capture faculty and researchers’ scholarly outputs and activities. These systems usually include public pro les and tools to help nd collaborators or experts. They may be used to create reports for faculty annual reviews or for promotion and tenure, or to assist faculty with complying with open access policies by facilitating deposit in institutional repositories. In many universities, libraries play a central role in the implementation of these systems. This paper explores three case studies showing how and why libraries came into this role and examines some of the consequences of this trend.

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Scholars@Duke

Mangiafico

Paolo Mangiafico

Prof Library Staff

Paolo Mangiafico is the Scholarly Communications Strategist at Duke University, and member of ScholarWorks, a Center for Open Scholarship at Duke University Libraries. He is also Director of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute, a program funded by the Mellon Foundation that brings together leading thinkers and innovators from many disciplines and backgrounds to solve problems and develop initiatives that advance equity and access in scholarly communication.

In his role at Duke, Paolo works with librarians, technologists, faculty, students, and university leadership to plan and implement programs that promote ethical and equitable uses of research and publishing technologies, as well as greater reach and impact for scholarship in many forms, including work on open access to publications and data, licensing and copyright issues, ethical use of research metrics, and emerging platforms for publishing digital scholarship. His work focuses on how new technologies can be adapted to further the knowledge-sharing mission of research universities, and the intersection between social, economic, and technical systems.
 
Paolo previously served as Director of Digital Information Strategy in the Office of the Provost at Duke University, and has been a fellow in the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke, led an early digital library project called The Digital Scriptorium as well as Duke Libraries’ Web Services and Research & Development departments, and has served as a consultant for universities, university presses, and government agencies, and as a lecturer in information science and responsible conduct of research. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors of Dryad, a non-profit membership organization supporting a digital repository for research data, and on the advisory boards and steering committees of many other programs, including the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions, the Libraria collective, the Forum for Scholars and Publics, and DMPTool, among others. His volunteer civic work has included serving as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Durham County Library, being a tutor for the English for Speakers of Other Languages program at the Durham Literacy Center, and serving as a Guardian ad Litem, advocating on behalf of abused and neglected children through the Durham County courts and social services.


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