Visual hallucinations: A novel complication after hemispherectomy.

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2018-01

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Abstract

Two patients at our center experienced florid visual hallucinations following hemispherectomy. The first patient had drug-resistant left hemispheric focal seizures at 20 months of age from a previous stroke. Following functional hemispherectomy at age 3, he experienced frightening hallucinations 1 month post-operatively lasting 3.5 months. Our second patient underwent subtotal hemispherectomy at age 6 for drug-resistant focal seizures from right hemispheric cortical dysplasia. Eighteen months later he developed scary visual hallucinations during which he would shout and throw things. Hallucinations recurred for 6 months. In our experience in these patients, even though symptoms were florid, they were transient and subsided 3-6 months later.

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10.1016/j.ebcr.2017.09.005

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Vanags, Jonas, Monisha Sachdev, Gerald Grant and Mohamad A Mikati (2018). Visual hallucinations: A novel complication after hemispherectomy. Epilepsy & behavior case reports, 9. pp. 51–53. 10.1016/j.ebcr.2017.09.005 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25900.

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Grant

Gerald Arthur Grant

Allan H. Friedman Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery
Mikati

Mohamad Abdul Mikati

Wilburt C. Davison Distinguished Professor

Mohamad A.  Mikati M.D., is the Wilburt C. Davison Professor of Pediatrics, Professor of Neurobiology, and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Neurology. Dr. Mikati’s clinical research has centered on characterization and therapy of pediatric epilepsy and neurology syndromes, describing several new pediatric neurological entities with two carrying his name (POSSUM syndromes # 3708 and 4468), developing novel therapeutic strategies for epilepsy and related disorders particularly Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood, and applying cutting edge genetic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to drug resistant pediatric epilepsy.  In the laboratory he has elucidated mechanisms of seizure related neuronal injury, particularly those related to the ceramide pathway, and demonstrated neuroprotective effects of several agents including erythropoietin. Most recently he has concentrated his laboratory research on the pathophysiology of ATP1A3 dysfunction in the brain as model for epilepsy and of Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood. He has more than 290 peer reviewed publications, 400 abstracts 41 chapters one book and two booklets. He also has more than 10,497 citations in the literature with an h-index of 58 and an i-10index of 190. Dr. Mikati has written chapters on epilepsy and related disorders in the major textbooks of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology including Swaiman’s Pediatric Neurology and Nelson’s Pediatrics. Before joining Duke in 2008 he had completed his M.D. and Pediatric training at the American University of Beirut, his Neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, his Neurophysiology at Boston Children’s Hospital and had been on the Faculty at Harvard as Director of Research in the Epilepsy Program at Boston Children’s Hospital and then as Professor and Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, Founder and Director of the Adult and Pediatric Epilepsy Program at the American University of Beirut. Dr. Mikati has had several international leadership roles including being President of the Union of the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean Pediatric Societies, on the Standing Committee of the International Pediatric Association (IPA), Chair of the Strategic Advisory Group on Early Childhood Development of the IPA, Officer of the International Child Neurology Association, Consultant to UNICEF, WHO, and the American Board of Pediatrics. He was selected to organize and chair the American Epilepsy Society's Merritt-Putnam Symposium and was one of only two Pediatric Neurologists, initially chosen worldwide, on the WHO advisory committee for the International Classification of Disease. He has received several national and international honors including, among others, Merritt Putnam American Epilepsy Society Fellowship Award, Harvard Community Health Plan Peer recognition Award, Debs Research Award, Hamdan Award for contributions to Medicine, Hans Zellweger Award for contributions to Pediatric Neurology, Patient Choice Award and the Michael Frank Award for research and lifetime contributions to the field of Pediatric Neurology.


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