Redlining Matters: Neighborhood Differences in Vegetative Cover, Urban Heat and Heat-Related Illnesses in Durham, North Carolina

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2022-04-21

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Abstract

Discriminatory, race-based housing practices, known as “redlining” resulted in refused home loans, insurance, and other essential investments such as green infrastructure beginning in the 1930s. Although redlining was abandoned in the 1960s, research suggests it continues to have implications for many communities. In this project, we evaluated environmental factors (i.e., vegetative cover and urban heat) to determine if the effects of redlining persist in Durham, North Carolina. Formerly redlined areas had less vegetation and more heat exposure. We also investigated heat-related illnesses and found the same communities had higher incidence rates of heat-related illnesses, especially among non-Hispanic Black residents. Cumulatively, our study demonstrates current health and environmental disparities related for the historical redlining policy.

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Chen, Ruoxue (2022). Redlining Matters: Neighborhood Differences in Vegetative Cover, Urban Heat and Heat-Related Illnesses in Durham, North Carolina. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/24864.


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