Synergist ablation-induced hypertrophy occurs more rapidly in the plantaris than soleus muscle in rats due to different molecular mechanisms

Abstract

<jats:p> We examined molecular mechanisms that were altered during rapid soleus (type I fiber-dominant) and plantaris (type II fiber-dominant) hypertrophy in rats. Twelve Wistar rats (3.5 mo old; 6 female, 6 male) were subjected to surgical right-leg soleus and plantaris dual overload [synergist ablation (SA)], and sham surgeries were performed on left legs (CTL). At 14 days after surgery, the muscles were dissected. Plantaris mass was 27% greater in the SA than CTL leg ( P < 0.001), soleus mass was 13% greater in the SA than CTL leg ( P < 0.001), and plantaris mass was higher than soleus mass in the SA leg ( P = 0.001). Plantaris total RNA concentrations and estimated total RNA levels (suggestive of ribosome density) were 19% and 47% greater in the SA than CTL leg ( P < 0.05), protein synthesis levels were 64% greater in the SA than CTL leg ( P = 0.038), and satellite cell number per fiber was 60% greater in the SA than CTL leg ( P = 0.003); no differences in these metrics were observed between soleus SA and CTL legs. Plantaris, as well as soleus, 20S proteasome activity was lower in the SA than CTL leg ( P < 0.05), although the degree of downregulation was greater in the plantaris than soleus muscle (−63% vs. −20%, P = 0.001). These data suggest that early-phase plantaris hypertrophy occurs more rapidly than soleus hypertrophy, which coincided with greater increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, and satellite cell density, as well as greater decrements in 20S proteasome activity, in the plantaris muscle. </jats:p>

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10.1152/ajpregu.00304.2019

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Roberts, Michael D, Christopher B Mobley, Christopher G Vann, Cody T Haun, Brad J Schoenfeld, Kaelin C Young and Andreas N Kavazis (2020). Synergist ablation-induced hypertrophy occurs more rapidly in the plantaris than soleus muscle in rats due to different molecular mechanisms. American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 318(2). pp. R360–R368. 10.1152/ajpregu.00304.2019 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29767.

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Vann

Christopher Vann

Postdoctoral Scholar

Dr. Vann is an exercise physiologist with a research focus centered in skeletal muscle physiology. His research focuses on elucidating mechanisms of tissue-to-tissue crosstalk and understanding how exercise-induced changes in epigenetic, genetic, and protein-level factors relate to health and performance outcomes across the age span. As rates of obesity, cardiometabolic disease, and sarcopenia increase in the U.S., Dr. Vann's research is centered on understanding the role of exercise in improved health outcomes at the molecular level and applying this knowledge to develop precise evidence based exercise interventions.


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