Using ground reaction force to predict knee kinetic asymmetry following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

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2014-12

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Abstract

Asymmetries in sagittal plane knee kinetics have been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury. Clinical tools are needed to identify the asymmetries. This study examined the relationships between knee kinetic asymmetries and ground reaction force (GRF) asymmetries during athletic tasks in adolescent patients following ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). Kinematic and GRF data were collected during a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task for 23 patients. Asymmetry indices between the surgical and non-surgical limbs were calculated for GRF and knee kinetic variables. For the stop-jump task, knee kinetics asymmetry indices were correlated with all GRF asymmetry indices (P < 0.05), except for loading rate. Vertical GRF impulse asymmetry index predicted peak knee moment, average knee moment, and knee work (R(2)  ≥ 0.78, P < 0.01) asymmetry indices. For the side-cutting tasks, knee kinetic asymmetry indices were correlated with the peak propulsion vertical GRF and vertical GRF impulse asymmetry indices (P < 0.05). Vertical GRF impulse asymmetry index predicted peak knee moment, average knee moment, and knee work (R(2)  ≥ 0.55, P < 0.01) asymmetry indices. The vertical GRF asymmetries may be a viable surrogate for knee kinetic asymmetries and therefore may assist in optimizing rehabilitation outcomes and minimizing re-injury rates.

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10.1111/sms.12118

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Dai, B, RJ Butler, WE Garrett and RM Queen (2014). Using ground reaction force to predict knee kinetic asymmetry following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Scand J Med Sci Sports, 24(6). pp. 974–981. 10.1111/sms.12118 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/8909.

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