Flow Cytometry Characterization of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monocytes in Patients With Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction: A Pilot Study.

Abstract

Animal models suggest postoperative cognitive dysfunction may be caused by brain monocyte influx. To study this in humans, we developed a flow cytometry panel to profile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected before and after major noncardiac surgery in 5 patients ≥60 years of age who developed postoperative cognitive dysfunction and 5 matched controls who did not. We detected 12,654 ± 4895 cells/10 mL of CSF sample (mean ± SD). Patients who developed postoperative cognitive dysfunction showed an increased CSF monocyte/lymphocyte ratio and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 receptor downregulation on CSF monocytes 24 hours after surgery. These pilot data demonstrate that CSF flow cytometry can be used to study mechanisms of postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1213/ane.0000000000004179

Publication Info

Berger, Miles, David M Murdoch, Janet S Staats, Cliburn Chan, Jake P Thomas, Grant E Garrigues, Jeffrey N Browndyke, Mary Cooter, et al. (2019). Flow Cytometry Characterization of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monocytes in Patients With Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction: A Pilot Study. Anesthesia and analgesia. pp. 1–1. 10.1213/ane.0000000000004179 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18624.

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