ImPlementation REsearCh to DEvelop Interventions for People Living with HIV (the PRECluDE consortium): Combatting chronic disease comorbidities in HIV populations through implementation research.

Abstract

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented premature mortality and improved the quality of life among people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH), such that now more than half of PLWH in the United States are 50 years of age and older. Increased longevity among PLWH has resulted in a significant rise in chronic, comorbid diseases. However, the implementation of guideline-based interventions for preventing, treating, and managing such age-related, chronic conditions among the HIV population is lacking. The PRECluDE consortium supported by the Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute catalyzes implementation research on proven-effective interventions for co-occurring heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases and conditions among PLWH. These collaborative research studies use novel implementation frameworks with HIV, mental health, cardiovascular, and pulmonary care to advance comprehensive HIV and chronic disease healthcare in a variety of settings and among diverse populations.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.pcad.2020.03.006

Publication Info

Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie, Christopher T Longenecker, Allison R Webel, David H Au, Arleen F Brown, Hayden Bosworth, Kristina Crothers, William E Cunningham, et al. (2020). ImPlementation REsearCh to DEvelop Interventions for People Living with HIV (the PRECluDE consortium): Combatting chronic disease comorbidities in HIV populations through implementation research. Progress in cardiovascular diseases, 63(2). pp. 79–91. 10.1016/j.pcad.2020.03.006 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29669.

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