A defensive mindset: A pattern of social information processing that develops early and predicts life course outcomes.

Abstract

The hypothesis was tested that some children develop a defensive mindset that subsumes individual social information processing (SIP) steps, grows from early experiences, and guides long-term outcomes. In Study 1 (Fast Track [FT]), 463 age-5 children (45% girls; 43% Black) were first assessed in 1991 and followed through age 32 (83% retention). In Study 2 (Child Development Project [CDP]), 585 age-5 children (48% girls, 17% Black) were first assessed in 1987 and followed through age 34 (78% retention). In both studies, measures were collected of early adverse experiences, defensive mindset and SIP, and adult outcomes. Across both studies, a robust latent construct of school-age defensive mindset was validated empirically (comparative fit index = .99 in each study) and found to mediate the impact of early child abuse (38% in FT and 29% in CDP of total effect) and peer social rejection (14% in FT and 7% in CDP of total effect) on adult incarceration.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1111/cdev.13751

Publication Info

Dodge, Kenneth A, Yu Bai, Jennifer Godwin, Jennifer E Lansford, John E Bates, Gregory S Pettit and Damon Jones (2022). A defensive mindset: A pattern of social information processing that develops early and predicts life course outcomes. Child development, 93(4). pp. e357–e378. 10.1111/cdev.13751 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29000.

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Scholars@Duke

Bai

Yu Bai

Statistician III

Jennifer Godwin

Research Scientist

Jennifer Godwin is a research scientist at the Center for Child and Family Policy. She joined the Center in 2003 to provide statistical expertise for various projects. Currently, she works on the Fast Track and Childhood Risk Factors and Young Adult Competence projects, providing statistical analyses. She has extensive programming experience in SAS, Stata and MPlus, including survival analysis, mediation models, and multilevel models for continuous and categorical dependent variables.

Lansford

Jennifer Lansford

S. Malcolm Gillis Distinguished Research Professor of Public Policy

Jennifer Lansford is the director of the Center for Child and Family Policy and S. Malcolm Gillis Distinguished Research Professor of Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy.

Dr. Lansford's research focuses on the development of aggression and other behavior problems in youth, with an emphasis on how family and peer contexts contribute to or protect against these outcomes. She examines how experiences with parents (e.g., physical abuse, discipline, divorce) and peers (e.g., rejection, friendships) affect the development of children's behavior problems, how influence operates in adolescent peer groups, and how cultural contexts moderate links between parenting and children's adjustment.


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