Mapping 123 million neonatal, infant and child deaths between 2000 and 2017.

Abstract

Since 2000, many countries have achieved considerable success in improving child survival, but localized progress remains unclear. To inform efforts towards United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3.2-to end preventable child deaths by 2030-we need consistently estimated data at the subnational level regarding child mortality rates and trends. Here we quantified, for the period 2000-2017, the subnational variation in mortality rates and number of deaths of neonates, infants and children under 5 years of age within 99 low- and middle-income countries using a geostatistical survival model. We estimated that 32% of children under 5 in these countries lived in districts that had attained rates of 25 or fewer child deaths per 1,000 live births by 2017, and that 58% of child deaths between 2000 and 2017 in these countries could have been averted in the absence of geographical inequality. This study enables the identification of high-mortality clusters, patterns of progress and geographical inequalities to inform appropriate investments and implementations that will help to improve the health of all populations.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1038/s41586-019-1545-0

Publication Info

Burstein, Roy, Nathaniel J Henry, Michael L Collison, Laurie B Marczak, Amber Sligar, Stefanie Watson, Neal Marquez, Mahdieh Abbasalizad-Farhangi, et al. (2019). Mapping 123 million neonatal, infant and child deaths between 2000 and 2017. Nature, 574(7778). pp. 353–358. 10.1038/s41586-019-1545-0 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25700.

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Scholars@Duke

Lopez

Jaifred (Jim) Lopez

Student

Jaifred Christian Lopez, or Jim, is a doctoral student at the Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University. He is a clinically trained physician (licensed in the Philippines) with a master’s in public management. He now focuses on health systems research.

He is currently involved in projects related to health systems innovation within the US Veterans Health Administration, and in the global health context (through ongoing collaborations with colleagues based in the Philippines and other countries). He has been published in local and international journals and has been featured in print and mass media in the Philippines and internationally.

At Duke, he is a scholar of the Biosciences Collaborative for Research Engagement (BioCoRE) program, which aims to promote diversity and inclusion in biomedical and health sciences research. He is a founding member of the board of trustees of the Philippine Society of Public Health Physicians, Inc., founding member of the Young Physician Leaders (YPL) Alumni Steering Committee, which gathers graduates of the InterAcademy Partnership's YPL Programme, and a founding trustee of Tambalista, Inc., which aims to advance nature-based products research in the Philippines through academe-industry partnerships.

Education


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