Understanding competing mechanisms for glass transition changes in filled elastomers

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2016-04

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10.1016/j.compscitech.2016.02.027

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Wood, Charles D, Amin Ajdari, Craig W Burkhart, Karl W Putz and L Catherine Brinson (2016). Understanding competing mechanisms for glass transition changes in filled elastomers. Composites Science and Technology, 127. 10.1016/j.compscitech.2016.02.027 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16439.

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Brinson

L. Catherine Brinson

Sharon C. and Harold L. Yoh, III Distinguished Professor

The Brinson lab’s research objective is to characterize and model advanced materials systems, bridging across scales, to develop new understanding of material mechanisms and transfer knowledge into FAIR datasets towards novel material design. The research activities include nanoscale experimental investigations, especially using AFM methodologies, computational predictions of material behavior using finite element analysis and micro mechanics approaches, and application of AI methods including surrogate modeling, optimization, and natural language processing. Target material systems include multiphase polymer systems, nancomposites, bioplastics, metamaterials and 3d printing materials. 


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