Comparison of a reduced carbohydrate and reduced fat diet for LDL, HDL, and VLDL subclasses during 9-months of weight maintenance subsequent to weight loss.

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2010-06-01

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study compared LDL, HDL, and VLDL subclasses in overweight or obese adults consuming either a reduced carbohydrate (RC) or reduced fat (RF) weight maintenance diet for 9 months following significant weight loss. METHODS: Thirty-five (21 RC; 14 RF) overweight or obese middle-aged adults completed a 1-year weight management clinic. Participants met weekly for the first six months and bi-weekly thereafter. Meetings included instruction for diet, physical activity, and behavior change related to weight management. Additionally, participants followed a liquid very low-energy diet of approximately 2092 kJ per day for the first three months of the study. Subsequently, participants followed a dietary plan for nine months that targeted a reduced percentage of carbohydrate (approximately 20%) or fat (approximately 30%) intake and an energy intake level calculated to maintain weight loss. Lipid subclasses using NMR spectroscopy were analyzed prior to weight loss and at multiple intervals during weight maintenance. RESULTS: Body weight change was not significantly different within or between groups during weight maintenance (p>0.05). The RC group showed significant increases in mean LDL size, large LDL, total HDL, large and small HDL, mean VLDL size, and large VLDL during weight maintenance while the RF group showed increases in total HDL, large and small HDL, total VLDL, and large, medium, and small VLDL (p<0.05). Group*time interactions were significant for large and medium VLDL (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Some individual lipid subclasses improved in both dietary groups. Large and medium VLDL subclasses increased to a greater extent across weight maintenance in the RF group.

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10.1186/1476-511X-9-54

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LeCheminant, James D, Bryan K Smith, Eric C Westman, Mary C Vernon and Joseph E Donnelly (2010). Comparison of a reduced carbohydrate and reduced fat diet for LDL, HDL, and VLDL subclasses during 9-months of weight maintenance subsequent to weight loss. Lipids Health Dis, 9. p. 54. 10.1186/1476-511X-9-54 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4368.

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Westman

Eric Charles Westman

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. Westman is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Duke University. He is Board Certified in Obesity Medicine and Internal Medicine, and founded the Duke Keto Medicine Clinic with Dr. William S. Yancy Jr. in 2006 after 8 years of clinical research regarding low carbohydrate ketogenic diets. 

He is Past-President and Master Fellow of the Obesity Medicine Association and Fellow of The Obesity Society. He is an editor of the textbook: Obesity: Evaluation & Treatment Essentials, and author of the New York Times Bestseller The New Atkins for a New You, Cholesterol Clarity, and Keto Clarity. He is co-founder of Adapt Your Life, an education and product company based on low carbohydrate concepts.

He is course coordinator for MED415c, a Fourth-Year Medical Student Elective on the Medical Management of Obesity, and a faculty member of the Duke Clinical Research Training Program. 


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