Baseline medication adherence and blood pressure in a 24-month longitudinal hypertension study.

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2011-11

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Abstract

Aim and objectives.  We sought to identify the feasibility and predictive validity of an easy and quick self-reported measure of medication adherence and to identify characteristics of people with hypertension that may warrant increase attentiveness by nurses to address hypertensive self-management needs. Background.  Current control rates of hypertension are approximately 50%. Effective blood pressure control can be achieved in most people with hypertension through antihypertensive medication. However, hypertension control can only be achieved if the patient is adherent with their medication regimen. Patients who are non-adherent may be in need of additional intervention. Design.  This secondary analysis evaluated the systolic blood pressure of patients who received usual hypertension management across 24 months at six-month intervals. Methods.  A longitudinal study of 159 hypertensive patients in two primary care clinics. Results.  In a sample of 159 patients receiving care in a primary care facility, baseline medication non-adherence was associated with a 6·3 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (p

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10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03859.x

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Shaw, R, and HB Bosworth (2011). Baseline medication adherence and blood pressure in a 24-month longitudinal hypertension study. Journal of clinical nursing, 21(9-10). pp. 1401–1406. 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03859.x Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/30052.

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Scholars@Duke

Shaw

Ryan Shaw

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

Ryan Shaw is at the forefront of integrating patient-generated health data and emerging technologies into novel care delivery models. Using a health equity lens, his research focuses on data from wearables, sensors, and devices that enhance patient care and interact with electronic health records (EHRs). His innovative work has attracted funding from institutions like the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

As the Director of Duke University School of Nursing's Health Innovation Lab, located adjacent to Duke Hospital, he oversees a space for entrepreneurship, product development and testing, and modeling care delivery processes. Additionally, he teaches classes in health informatics and research methods, and mentors students to become the next generation of health scientists and clinicians.

Dr. Shaw's work is shaping the future of healthcare through the integration of technology and patient-centered data in nursing practice.

He currently co-leads two NIH-funded clinical trials:
EXTEND (Grant R01NR019594): extend.nursing.duke.edu
Log2lose (Grant U24HL150227): log2lose.com

Bosworth

Hayden Barry Bosworth

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Dr. Bosworth is a health services researcher and Deputy Director of the Center of Innovation to Accelerate Discovery and Practice Transformation (ADAPT)  at the Durham VA Medical Center. He is also Vice Chair of Education and Professor of Population Health Sciences. He is also a Professor of Medicine, Psychiatry, and Nursing at Duke University Medical Center and Adjunct Professor in Health Policy and Administration at the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests comprise three overarching areas of research: 1) clinical research that provides knowledge for improving patients’ treatment adherence and self-management in chronic care; 2) translation research to improve access to quality of care; and 3) eliminate health care disparities. 

Dr. Bosworth is the recipient of an American Heart Association established investigator award, the 2013 VA Undersecretary Award for Outstanding Achievement in Health Services Research (The annual award is the highest honor for VA health services researchers), and a VA Senior Career Scientist Award. In terms of self-management, Dr. Bosworth has expertise developing interventions to improve health behaviors related to hypertension, coronary artery disease, and depression, and has been developing and implementing tailored patient interventions to reduce the burden of other chronic diseases. These trials focus on motivating individuals to initiate health behaviors and sustaining them long term and use members of the healthcare team, particularly pharmacists and nurses. He has been the Principal Investigator of over 30 trials resulting in over 400 peer reviewed publications and four books. This work has been or is being implemented in multiple arenas including Medicaid of North Carolina, private payers, The United Kingdom National Health System Direct, Kaiser Health care system, and the Veterans Affairs.

Areas of Expertise: Health Behavior, Health Services Research, Implementation Science, Health Measurement, and Health Policy


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