Meningococcemia in a patient coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV.

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2000-11

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Abstract

We describe the first reported case of meningococcemia in a patient coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV. Hypocomplementemia secondary to hepatic dysfunction may have enhanced the patient's susceptibility to meningococcal infection.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.3201/eid0606.000615

Publication Info

Nelson, CG, MA Iler, CW Woods, JA Bartlett and VG Fowler (2000). Meningococcemia in a patient coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV. Emerg Infect Dis, 6(6). pp. 646–648. 10.3201/eid0606.000615 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13327.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Woods

Christopher Wildrick Woods

Wolfgang Joklik Distinguished Professor of Global Health

1. Emerging Infections
2. Global Health
3. Epidemiology of infectious diseases
4. Clinical microbiology and diagnostics
5. Bioterrorism Preparedness
6. Surveillance for communicable diseases
7. Antimicrobial resistance

Bartlett

John Alexander Bartlett

Professor of Medicine

My clinical investigation is focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection and its complications, especially in resource-limited settings.

Key Words: HIV infection, AIDS, treatment strategies, treatment failure, co-infections, resource-limited settings

Fowler

Vance Garrison Fowler

Florence McAlister Distinguished Professor of Medicine

Determinants of Outcome in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia
Antibacterial Resistance
Pathogenesis of Bacterial Infections
Tropical medicine/International Health


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