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Manufacturing Fetishism: The Neo-Mercantilist Preoccupation with Protecting Manufacturing

dc.contributor.author Cassidy, AW
dc.contributor.author Tower, E
dc.contributor.author Wang, X
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-06T19:21:03Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-06T19:21:03Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-06
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13218
dc.description.abstract Two common views are that a country cannot develop without a strong manufacturing base and that trade restrictions are essential to facilitate the development of that strong manufacturing base and thus spur economic growth. We ask: • Does a strong manufacturing share of GDP facilitate economic growth? • Do trade restrictions ensure the development of a strong manufacturing base? • How can governance affect manufacturing share? • And are the relationships we find robust across regions? We find the manufacturing share is not significantly correlated with a higher standard of living. Nor is it related significantly and consistently to economic growth. We also find that trade restrictions both at home and abroad shrink the manufacturing base and smother economic growth. A better way than protectionism and subsidies specific to industry to enhance economic growth is to improve governance effectiveness and the quality of regulation.
dc.format.extent 30 pages
dc.publisher WORLD SCIENTIFIC
dc.relation.ispartof Economic Research Initiatives at Duke (ERID)
dc.subject Manufacturing Share
dc.subject Economic Growth
dc.subject Trade Restrictions
dc.title Manufacturing Fetishism: The Neo-Mercantilist Preoccupation with Protecting Manufacturing
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Tower, E|0096168
pubs.issue 227
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Economics
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences


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