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Prevalence and correlates of treatment utilization among adults with cannabis use disorder in the United States.

dc.contributor.author Wu, Li-Tzy
dc.contributor.author Zhu, He
dc.contributor.author Mannelli, Paolo
dc.contributor.author Swartz, Marvin S
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-03T04:09:26Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-03T04:09:26Z
dc.date.issued 2017-08
dc.identifier S0376-8716(17)30228-4
dc.identifier.issn 0376-8716
dc.identifier.issn 1879-0046
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19937
dc.description.abstract The increase in cannabis potency may have treatment implications for cannabis use disorder (CUD). Given the reported increase in prevalence of cannabis use among adults, there is a need to understand substance use treatment needs for CUD.We examined demographics and behavioral health indicators of adults aged ≥18 years that met criteria for past-year CUD (n=10,943) in the 2005-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. We determined prevalence and correlates of past-year treatment use for alcohol/drug, any drug, and cannabis use related problems, to inform treatment efforts for CUD.The majority of adults with past-year CUD were young adults aged 18-25 or men, had low income, and did not attend college. Two-thirds of adults with CUD met criteria for cannabis dependence, which was comparatively common among younger adults, women, low-income or publicly insured adults, and college-educated adults. Nicotine dependence (40.92%) and alcohol (44.07%) or other drug use disorder (19.70%) were prevalent among adults with CUD. Overall, less than 13% of adults with CUD had received alcohol/drug use treatment the past year; only 7.8% received cannabis-specific treatment. There was no significant yearly variation in treatment use prevalence over 9 years. In particular, Asian-Americans, women, and college-educated adults underutilized cannabis-specific treatment.This large sample of adults with CUD reveals pervasive underutilization of cannabis-related treatment, especially in women, married adults, and those with college education, despite a high proportion of comorbid behavioral health problems.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Elsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartof Drug and alcohol dependence
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.03.037
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Marijuana Abuse
dc.subject Tobacco Use Disorder
dc.subject Prevalence
dc.subject Marijuana Smoking
dc.subject Comorbidity
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Patient Acceptance of Health Care
dc.subject United States
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.subject Surveys and Questionnaires
dc.title Prevalence and correlates of treatment utilization among adults with cannabis use disorder in the United States.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Wu, Li-Tzy|0380644
duke.contributor.id Mannelli, Paolo|0331498
duke.contributor.id Swartz, Marvin S|0053343
dc.date.updated 2020-02-03T04:09:25Z
pubs.begin-page 153
pubs.end-page 162
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Social and Community Psychiatry
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, General Internal Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 177
duke.contributor.orcid Wu, Li-Tzy|0000-0002-5909-2259
duke.contributor.orcid Mannelli, Paolo|0000-0002-7834-6138


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