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Comorbid substance use disorders with other Axis I and II mental disorders among treatment-seeking Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, and mixed-race people.

dc.contributor.author Wu, Li-Tzy
dc.contributor.author Blazer, Dan G
dc.contributor.author Gersing, Kenneth R
dc.contributor.author Burchett, Bruce
dc.contributor.author Swartz, Marvin S
dc.contributor.author Mannelli, Paolo
dc.contributor.author NIDA AAPI Workgroup
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-03T04:52:55Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-03T04:52:55Z
dc.date.issued 2013-12
dc.identifier S0022-3956(13)00273-2
dc.identifier.issn 0022-3956
dc.identifier.issn 1879-1379
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19973
dc.description.abstract Little is known about behavioral healthcare needs of Asian Americans (AAs), Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (NHs/PIs), and mixed-race people (MRs)-the fastest growing segments of the U.S. population. We examined substance use disorder (SUD) prevalences and comorbidities among AAs, NHs/PIs, and MRs (N = 4572) in a behavioral health electronic health record database. DSM-IV diagnoses among patients aged 1-90 years who accessed behavioral healthcare from 11 sites were systematically captured: SUD, anxiety, mood, personality, adjustment, childhood-onset, cognitive/dementia, dissociative, eating, factitious, impulse-control, psychotic/schizophrenic, sleep, and somatoform diagnoses. Of all patients, 15.0% had a SUD. Mood (60%), anxiety (31.2%), adjustment (30.9%), and disruptive (attention deficit-hyperactivity, conduct, oppositional defiant, disruptive behavior diagnosis, 22.7%) diagnoses were more common than others (psychotic 14.2%, personality 13.3%, other childhood-onset 11.4%, impulse-control 6.6%, cognitive 2.8%, eating 2.2%, somatoform 2.1%). Less than 1% of children aged <12 years had SUD. Cannabis diagnosis was the primary SUD affecting adolescents aged 12-17. MRs aged 35-49 years had the highest prevalence of cocaine diagnosis. Controlling for age at first visit, sex, treatment setting, length of treatment, and number of comorbid diagnoses, NHs/PIs and MRs were about two times more likely than AAs to have ≥ 2 SUDs. Regardless of race/ethnicity, personality diagnosis was comorbid with SUD. NHs/PIs with a mood diagnosis had elevated odds of having SUD. Findings present the most comprehensive patterns of mental diagnoses available for treatment-seeking AAs, NHs/PIs, and MRs in the real-world medical setting. In-depth research is needed to elucidate intraracial and interracial differences in treatment needs.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Elsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of psychiatric research
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.08.022
dc.subject NIDA AAPI Workgroup
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Substance-Related Disorders
dc.subject Prevalence
dc.subject Mental Disorders
dc.subject Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subject Personality Inventory
dc.subject Age Factors
dc.subject Comorbidity
dc.subject Sex Factors
dc.subject Databases, Factual
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Aged, 80 and over
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Child
dc.subject Child, Preschool
dc.subject Infant
dc.subject Asian Americans
dc.subject Oceanic Ancestry Group
dc.subject Ethnic Groups
dc.subject Hawaii
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title Comorbid substance use disorders with other Axis I and II mental disorders among treatment-seeking Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, and mixed-race people.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Wu, Li-Tzy|0380644
duke.contributor.id Blazer, Dan G|0082509
duke.contributor.id Burchett, Bruce|0069113
duke.contributor.id Swartz, Marvin S|0053343
duke.contributor.id Mannelli, Paolo|0331498
dc.date.updated 2020-02-03T04:52:54Z
pubs.begin-page 1940
pubs.end-page 1948
pubs.issue 12
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Family Medicine and Community Health
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Social and Community Psychiatry
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, General Internal Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 47
duke.contributor.orcid Wu, Li-Tzy|0000-0002-5909-2259
duke.contributor.orcid Mannelli, Paolo|0000-0002-7834-6138


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