What We Owe the Global Poor: In Defense of a Moderate Principle of Sacrifice

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2012

Authors

Robson, Gregory J.

Advisors

Flanagan, Owen J

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

798
views
6794
downloads

Abstract

Peter Singer's 1971 essay "Famine, Affluence, and Morality" sparked a surge in interest among philosophers in the beneficent obligations of the global rich to assist the global poor. Richard Miller, a prominent recent critic of Singer, has argued that Singer's position is too demanding and proposed the Principle of Sympathy as an alternative to Singer's Principle of Sacrifice. I argue against Miller's view and highlight problematic features of his "daughter's aesthetic sense" example and his "closeness-to-heart" criterion. After critically examining Miller's and Singer's alternative accounts, I argue for a substantially revised version of Singer's position. The Moderate Principle of Sacrifice (MPS) that I propose includes four revisions to Singer's account. These revisions allow it more plausibly to capture our beneficent obligations to assist the global poor.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Citation

Robson, Gregory J. (2012). What We Owe the Global Poor: In Defense of a Moderate Principle of Sacrifice. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/5506.

Collections


Dukes student scholarship is made available to the public using a Creative Commons Attribution / Non-commercial / No derivative (CC-BY-NC-ND) license.