Assessment of the psychometric properties of an English version of the cancer dyspnea scale in people with advanced lung cancer.

Abstract

Context

Dyspnea is a poorly understood subjective sensation. Existing dyspnea measures fail to adequately address its multidimensionality. A Japanese group developed and validated the Cancer Dyspnea Scale (CDS) for assessing dyspnea in patients with advanced lung cancer.

Objectives

We evaluated the validity and reliability of the English version of the CDS (CDS-E) that has 12 items and takes, on average, 140 seconds for individuals to complete.

Methods

Eligible patients had advanced lung cancer, consented, and were fluent in English. Participants completed a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), the modified Borg scale, the CDS-E, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Lung quality-of-life scale. Demographic, radiographic, and treatment information were obtained from patients' medical records.

Results

One hundred twelve participants were enrolled at three sites in the U.S., Australia, and the U.K. Mean age was 64.5 years (SD 11.5); 90% were Caucasian, 68% had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, and 50% had non-small cell carcinoma. All completed the CDS-E independently, without difficulty. The CDS-E had reasonable internal consistency overall (Cronbach's α = 0.71) and for each of the three factors (effort, anxiety, discomfort Cronbach's α = 0.80-0.84). CDS-E scores were significantly correlated with the 100mm VAS (r = 0.82; P < 0.001) and the modified Borg (r = 0.87; P < 0.001). After factor analysis, the CDS-E was revised by removing three items (r-CDS-E).

Conclusion

The CDS-E and r-CDS-E are reliable and valid measures of the sensation and the psychological components of dyspnea, with the shorter version having similar psychometric properties.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.10.027

Publication Info

Uronis, Hope E, Rebecca A Shelby, David C Currow, Sam H Ahmedzai, Hayden B Bosworth, April Coan and Amy P Abernethy (2012). Assessment of the psychometric properties of an English version of the cancer dyspnea scale in people with advanced lung cancer. Journal of pain and symptom management, 44(5). pp. 741–749. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.10.027 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/30048.

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Scholars@Duke

Uronis

Hope Elizabeth Uronis

Associate Professor of Medicine
Shelby

Rebecca A Shelby

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Rebecca Shelby, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor with Tenure in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and the Director of Education and Training for the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.  Dr. Shelby is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Shelby completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.  Her research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions for cancer patients, management of cancer pain and treatment side effects, and improving adherence to recommended care. Dr. Shelby serves on the Duke clinical psychology internship faculty and supervises clinical psychology fellows, interns, and clinical psychology graduate practicum students completing clinical rotations as part of the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.   


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