Computational spectral microscopy and compressive millimeter-wave holography

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2010

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Abstract

This dissertation describes three computational sensors. The first sensor is a scanning multi-spectral aperture-coded microscope containing a coded aperture spectrometer that is vertically scanned through a microscope intermediate image plane. The spectrometer aperture-code spatially encodes the object spectral data and nonnegative

least squares inversion combined with a series of reconfigured two-dimensional (2D spatial-spectral) scanned measurements enables three-dimensional (3D) (x, y, λ) object estimation. The second sensor is a coded aperture snapshot spectral imager that employs a compressive optical architecture to record a spectrally filtered projection

of a 3D object data cube onto a 2D detector array. Two nonlinear and adapted TV-minimization schemes are presented for 3D (x,y,λ) object estimation from a 2D compressed snapshot. Both sensors are interfaced to laboratory-grade microscopes and

applied to fluorescence microscopy. The third sensor is a millimeter-wave holographic imaging system that is used to study the impact of 2D compressive measurement on 3D (x,y,z) data estimation. Holography is a natural compressive encoder since a 3D

parabolic slice of the object band volume is recorded onto a 2D planar surface. An adapted nonlinear TV-minimization algorithm is used for 3D tomographic estimation from a 2D and a sparse 2D hologram composite. This strategy aims to reduce scan time costs associated with millimeter-wave image acquisition using a single pixel receiver.

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Fernandez, Christy Ann (2010). Computational spectral microscopy and compressive millimeter-wave holography. Dissertation, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/2406.

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