Associations between Self-Stigma and Emotional Wellbeing Among Orphans

Abstract

Researchers have been searching for ways to improve outcomes for orphaned and separated children (OSC) worldwide. OSC have a particularly high rate of mental health disorders and lower emotional wellbeing. Stigma has been shown to be a predictor of mental health disorders and emotional wellbeing for HIV and children in poverty. However, no research has been conducted with OSC examining the relationship between self-stigma and emotional wellbeing. Using Round 10 of the Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO) study with 2013 orphans from Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, India, and Cambodia, a linear model was implemented to examine the association between self-stigma and emotional wellbeing. Through the building of a linear regression model, self-stigma was shown to be a strong predictor of emotional wellbeing as measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). This indicates that self-stigma may be a significant factor to address when looking at ways to improve emotional wellbeing among orphans.

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Citation

Wilkerson, Madeline (2022). Associations between Self-Stigma and Emotional Wellbeing Among Orphans. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25331.

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