The Role of Self-Control, Social Support, and Reliance on Others in the Religiosity-Health Link

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Date

2015

Authors

Hopkin, Cameron

Advisors

Hoyle, Rick H

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Abstract

Religious observance has been reliably shown to improve a wide variety of health outcomes across the lifespan. Significant work has already been done to find mediating processes that explain this relationship, but as yet no studies have been published that attempt to integrate these mediators into a single model to see if they all work together. The current study presents three possible mediators of the religiosity-health link: social support, self-control, and reliance on others. Participants were recruited from Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk worker system (N = 112) for a 14-day diary study in which all relevant constructs were measured on a daily basis, with daily health behaviors being the outcome. Social support, self-control, and reliance on others were all found to be simultaneous partial mediators of the religiosity-health link, though some questions remain as to the causal flow between religiosity and each of these mediators. It is concluded that each of these mechanisms is related to religiosity and in turn aid in the pursuit of superior health.

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Citation

Hopkin, Cameron (2015). The Role of Self-Control, Social Support, and Reliance on Others in the Religiosity-Health Link. Dissertation, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10537.

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