Introductions to the Community: Early-Career Researchers in the Time of COVID-19.

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2020-08

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Abstract

COVID-19 has unfortunately halted lab work, conferences, and in-person networking, which is especially detrimental to researchers just starting their labs. Through social media and our reviewer networks, we met some early-career stem cell investigators impacted by the closures. Here, they introduce themselves and their research to our readers.

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10.1016/j.stem.2020.07.016

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Shahbazi, Marta, Samira Musah, Ankur Sharma, Jeevisha Bajaj, Giacomo Donati and Weiqi Zhang (2020). Introductions to the Community: Early-Career Researchers in the Time of COVID-19. Cell stem cell, 27(2). pp. 200–201. 10.1016/j.stem.2020.07.016 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/22445.

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Musah

Samira Musah

Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering

The Musah Lab is interested in understanding how molecular signals and biophysical forces can function either synergistically or independently to guide organ development and physiology, and how these processes can be therapeutically harnessed to treat human disease. Given the escalating medical crisis in nephrology as growing number of patients suffer from kidney disease that can lead to organ failure, the Musah Lab focuses on engineering stem cell fate for applications in human kidney disease, extra-renal complications, and therapeutic development. Dr. Musah’s research interests include stem cell biology and regenerative medicine, molecular and cellular basis of human organ development and disease progression, organ engineering, patient-specific disease models, biomarker identification, therapeutic discovery, tissue and organ transplantation, microphysiological systems including Organ Chips (organs-on-chips) and organoids, matrix biology, mechanotransduction and disease biophysics.


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