Sea turtle nesting trends from 2011-2017 on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2019-04-17

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

298
views
364
downloads

Abstract

Six of the seven species of sea turtles are listed globally as either vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, largely due to anthropogenic threats. A significant component of conservation involves the protection of nesting females, their eggs, and resultant hatchlings on nesting beaches. Osa Conservation monitors two nesting beaches on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, a region that is particularly important for solitary-nesting olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtles. Using data collected during monitoring from 2011-2017, and from a protected hatchery from 2015-2017, I provide an analysis of nest abundance, spatial and temporal distribution of nests, predation, hatch success, and the efficacy of the protected hatchery. I also evaluate the key similarities and differences between the two nesting beaches, Playa Piro and Playa Pejeperro, as well as how the data compare to previous research in this same study area and what changes have occurred over time. With these results, I provide insight and recommendations for Osa Conservation’s monitoring and management plans, which may contribute towards their effort to limit threats to sea turtles and increase hatching success in this important region.

Description

Provenance

Subjects

Citation

Citation

Ossmann, Megan (2019). Sea turtle nesting trends from 2011-2017 on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18333.


Dukes student scholarship is made available to the public using a Creative Commons Attribution / Non-commercial / No derivative (CC-BY-NC-ND) license.