Text-messaging as a Tool for Medication Adherence and Behavior Change in Disease Management among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

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2016

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Abstract

Background: Evidence-based medication and lifestyle modification are important for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease but are underutilized. Mobile health strategies could address this gap but existing evidence is mixed. Therefore, we piloted a pre-post study to assess the impact of patient-directed text messages as a means of improving medication adherence and modifying major health risk behaviors among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in Hainan, China.

Methods: 92 CVD patients were surveyed between June and August 2015 (before the intervention) and then between October and December 2015 (after 12 week intervention) about (a) medication use (b) smoking status,(c) fruit and vegetable consumption, and (d) physical activity uptake. Acceptability of text-messaging intervention was assessed at follow-up. Descriptive statistics, along with paired comparisons between the pre and post outcomes were conducted using both parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (Wilcoxon signed rank test) methods.

Results: The number of respondents at follow-up was 82 (89% retention rate). Significant improvements were observed for medication adherence (P<0.001) and for the number of cigarettes smoked per day (P=.022). However there was no change in the number of smokers who quitted smoking at follow-up. There were insignificant changes for physical activity (P=0.91) and fruit and vegetable consumption.

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De La Cruz, Ginny (2016). Text-messaging as a Tool for Medication Adherence and Behavior Change in Disease Management among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12319.

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