Global desertification: Building a science for dryland development

Abstract

In this millennium, global drylands face a myriad of problems that present tough research, management, and policy challenges. Recent advances in dryland development, however, together with the integrative approaches of global change and sustainability science, suggest that concerns about land degradation, poverty, safeguarding biodiversity, and protecting the culture of 2.5 billion people can be confronted with renewed optimism. We review recent lessons about the functioning of dryland ecosystems and the livelihood systems of their human residents and introduce a new synthetic framework, the Drylands Development Paradigm (DDP). The DDP, supported by a growing and well-documented set of tools for policy and management action, helps navigate the inherent complexity of desertification and dryland development, identifying and synthesizing those factors important to research, management, and policy communities.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1126/science.1131634

Publication Info

REYNOLDS, F James, DM Stafford Smith, EF Lambin, BL Turner, undefined II, M Mortimore, SPJ Batterbury, et al. (2007). Global desertification: Building a science for dryland development. Science, 316(5826). pp. 847–851. 10.1126/science.1131634 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/24240.

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Scholars@Duke

Reynolds

James F. Reynolds

Professor Emeritus

Integrated assessment of complex human-environmental systems; Land degradation and desertification in global drylands; Conceptual frameworks and models to advance the science of dryland development


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