Can art represent a country? In search of Salvadoran Cultural and National Identities through 20th century literature, poetry, and art

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2016-04-21

Advisors

Rojas Sotelo, Miguel

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

393
views
1790
downloads

Abstract

As a citizen of El Salvador, I believe our cultural and national identities have not been clearly defined. This project considers the literary contributions of Salarrué and Claudia Lars together with the artistic works of Fernando Llort as integral components of a possible Salvadoran cultural and national identity. Their works exhibit a recognition of Indigenous roots or lo nuestro (ours), which I argue is an important missing component needed to create more inclusive and heterogeneous Salvadoran cultural and national identities. A brief recount of the history of El Salvador gives context for their personal and professional stories since politics was a relevant influential component on their works and lives. Two main historical and political events include the 1932 Indian campesino massacre, known as la Matanza or the slaughter, carried out by then President General Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez under the pretense of protection against communism, and the 1980 – 1992 civil war. The latter created by the division of social classes generated great discontent due to the abuses suffered by the many campesino workers under the powerful few wealthy land owners.

Description

Provenance

Citation

Citation

De La Cruz, Claudia M. (2016). Can art represent a country? In search of Salvadoran Cultural and National Identities through 20th century literature, poetry, and art. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11828.


Dukes student scholarship is made available to the public using a Creative Commons Attribution / Non-commercial / No derivative (CC-BY-NC-ND) license.