BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTRACTING MORE USEFUL LIFE FROM LITHIUM ION BATTERY SYSTEMS

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2017-04-25

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Abstract

Demand for new lithium-ion battery (LIB) systems is forecast to double between 2015 and 2020. However, current battery disposal practices mean that by 2020, tens of GWhs of still-useful lithium ion storage capacity could be directed towards landfills. While automotive companies are actively engaged in “second life” concepts for their electric vehicle batteries, it is not apparent that non-automotive batteries have similar applications. Non-automotive batteries have many different chemistries and form factors, and suffer from weak economics in the recycling process. This project explores the entrepreneurial viability of finding a “second-life” for non-automotive LIB systems. Specifically, we explore (1) capturing this low cost “waste” stream from primary users of batteries, (2) diagnosing and refurbishing used LIB systems, and (3) selling these systems to secondary users. Environmental benefits are quantified via (1) mineral conservation and (2) avoided emissions attributable to further unlocked levels of renewable energy supported by increased storage levels on the power grid.

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Bartlett, Dennis, Ted Herman and Andrew Klinkman (2017). BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTRACTING MORE USEFUL LIFE FROM LITHIUM ION BATTERY SYSTEMS. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14080.


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