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Patient-provider communication, self-reported medication adherence, and race in a postmyocardial infarction population.

dc.contributor.author Zullig, Leah L
dc.contributor.author Shaw, Ryan J
dc.contributor.author Shah, Bimal R
dc.contributor.author Peterson, Eric D
dc.contributor.author Lindquist, Jennifer H
dc.contributor.author Crowley, Matthew J
dc.contributor.author Grambow, Steven C
dc.contributor.author Bosworth, Hayden B
dc.coverage.spatial New Zealand
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-16T18:46:29Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25737633
dc.identifier ppa-9-311
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10311
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to: 1) describe patient-reported communication with their provider and explore differences in perceptions of racially diverse adherent versus nonadherent patients; and 2) examine whether the association between unanswered questions and patient-reported medication nonadherence varied as a function of patients' race. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline in-person survey data from a trial designed to improve postmyocardial infarction management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. RESULTS: Overall, 298 patients (74%) reported never leaving their doctor's office with unanswered questions. Among those who were adherent and nonadherent with their medications, 183 (79%) and 115 (67%) patients, respectively, never left their doctor's office with unanswered questions. In multivariable logistic regression, although the simple effects of the interaction term were different for patients of nonminority race (odds ratio [OR]: 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-3.92) and those of minority race (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 0.54-2.66), the overall interaction effect was not statistically significant (P=0.24). CONCLUSION: The quality of patient-provider communication is critical for cardiovascular disease medication adherence. In this study, however, having unanswered questions did not impact medication adherence differently as a function of patients' race. Nevertheless, there were racial differences in medication adherence that may need to be addressed to ensure optimal adherence and health outcomes. Effort should be made to provide training opportunities for both patients and their providers to ensure strong communication skills and to address potential differences in medication adherence in patients of diverse backgrounds.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Informa UK Limited
dc.relation.ispartof Patient Prefer Adherence
dc.relation.isversionof 10.2147/PPA.S75393
dc.subject acute myocardial infarction
dc.subject communication
dc.subject health policy and outcome research
dc.subject hypertension
dc.title Patient-provider communication, self-reported medication adherence, and race in a postmyocardial infarction population.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Zullig, Leah L|0453220
duke.contributor.id Shaw, Ryan J|0476082
duke.contributor.id Shah, Bimal R|0108012
duke.contributor.id Peterson, Eric D|0130909
duke.contributor.id Crowley, Matthew J|0327384
duke.contributor.id Grambow, Steven C|0234282
duke.contributor.id Bosworth, Hayden B|0212403
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25737633
pubs.begin-page 311
pubs.end-page 318
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
pubs.organisational-group Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Cardiology
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, General Internal Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group School of Nursing
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 9
duke.contributor.orcid Peterson, Eric D|0000-0002-5415-4721
duke.contributor.orcid Grambow, Steven C|0000-0001-6037-3253


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