Show simple item record

Spinal manipulative therapy-specific changes in pain sensitivity in individuals with low back pain (NCT01168999).

dc.contributor.author Bialosky, JE
dc.contributor.author George, Steven Z
dc.contributor.author Horn, Maggie Elizabeth
dc.contributor.author Price, DD
dc.contributor.author Robinson, ME
dc.contributor.author Staud, R
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-14T14:14:02Z
dc.date.issued 2014-02
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361109
dc.identifier S1526-5900(13)01300-X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/12761
dc.description.abstract UNLABELLED: Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is effective for some individuals experiencing low back pain; however, the mechanisms are not established regarding the role of placebo. SMT is associated with changes in pain sensitivity, suggesting related altered central nervous system response or processing of afferent nociceptive input. Placebo is also associated with changes in pain sensitivity, and the efficacy of SMT for changes in pain sensitivity beyond placebo has not been adequately considered. We randomly assigned 110 participants with low back pain to receive SMT, placebo SMT, placebo SMT with the instructional set "The manual therapy technique you will receive has been shown to significantly reduce low back pain in some people," or no intervention. Participants receiving the SMT and placebo SMT received their assigned intervention 6 times over 2 weeks. Pain sensitivity was assessed prior to and immediately following the assigned intervention during the first session. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and following 2 weeks of participation in the study. Immediate attenuation of suprathreshold heat response was greatest following SMT (P = .05, partial η(2) = .07). Group-dependent differences were not observed for changes in pain intensity and disability at 2 weeks. Participant satisfaction was greatest following the enhanced placebo SMT. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov under the identifier NCT01168999. PERSPECTIVE: The results of this study indicate attenuation of pain sensitivity is greater in response to SMT than the expectation of receiving an SMT. These findings suggest a potential mechanism of SMT related to lessening of central sensitization and may indicate a preclinical effect beyond the expectations of receiving SMT.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Pain
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.jpain.2013.10.005
dc.subject Central sensitization
dc.subject low back pain
dc.subject manual therapy
dc.subject placebo
dc.subject spinal manipulation
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Central Nervous System Sensitization
dc.subject Disability Evaluation
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Hot Temperature
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Low Back Pain
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Musculoskeletal Manipulations
dc.subject Pain Measurement
dc.subject Pain Threshold
dc.subject Patient Satisfaction
dc.subject Surveys and Questionnaires
dc.subject Time Factors
dc.subject Treatment Outcome
dc.title Spinal manipulative therapy-specific changes in pain sensitivity in individuals with low back pain (NCT01168999).
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361109
pubs.begin-page 136
pubs.end-page 148
pubs.issue 2
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Orthopaedics
pubs.organisational-group Orthopaedics, Physical Therapy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 15
dc.identifier.eissn 1528-8447


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record